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Posts from Meera Subramanian's Instagram series, "Elemental India."

#VQRTrueStory

December 7, 2015

#VQRtruestory is our new social-media experiment in nonfiction, bringing readers compelling stories and images from around the world, all through our Instagram feed.

The Death of Pablo Neruda

May 5, 2015

“Looking back now, I could have so easily walked to that cemetery and joined the men and women chanting next to his coffin,” Ariel Dorfman confesses. In addition to the documentary, "The Death of Pablo Neruda," this multimedia work includes an essay, “From Beyond the Grave,” by Dorfman, poetry by Martín Espada and Idra Novey, and a translation of Neruda’s poem “XII from The Heights of Macchu Picchu” by Mark Eisner.

VQR Nominated for Four National Magazine Awards

January 15, 2015

The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) today recognized the Virginia Quarterly Review with four nominations for its prestigious National Magazine Awards—the magazine world’s equivalent of the Pulitzer Prizes. VQR was named as a finalist [...]

Earth Day Reading from VQR

April 22, 2014

The Sweet Spot in Time by Sylvia A. Earle: Why the ocean matters to everyone, everywhere The Accidental Beekeeper by Benjamin Rachlin, photography by Peter Frank Edwards: What is the origin of the honey at your local farmer's market [...]

Summer Media Consumption List

September 4, 2013

This is no “Best Of” List. It’s no Top Ten. Rather, it’s a highly subjective list of the most compelling media objects, broadly defined, that I’ve encountered and endorse in my capacity as a media studies professor-doctor of celebrity gos [...]

The Second Emancipation Proclamation

August 28, 2013

  © Estate of Leonard Freed – Magnum Photos (Brigitte Freed)   Note: Today's post comes to us from the producers of BackStory. Click here to listen to the interview that inspired it. —— When the Reverend Martin Luther King J [...]

James Boswell and Samuel Johnson: The Original Odd Couple

August 5, 2013

On the morning of August 6, 1763, at the English port of Harwich, a wandering navvy—what Americans would call a dockworker—might have glimpsed a sight passing strange and strangely beautiful. Making their way across the pebble-strewn beach were two men who looked like the original “Odd Couple.”

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